Google Apps for Learning in Barrington 220 (VIDEO)

Google Apps deftly supplement stellar instruction and a wealth of curricular resources. Our teachers and students organize documents, collaborate on presentations, and give and provide timely feedback, thanks to the tools provided as part of the Google Apps for Education.

Google Apps offer a diverse group of applications, each with unique opportunities for teachers to design lessons, and for students to craft creative demonstrations of their learning. The basic Google Apps of Google Docs (for word processing documents), Google Sheets (for spreadsheets), and Google Slides (for presentations) give teachers and students three fundamental technology applications.
Google Apps: Docs, Sheets and Slides
Image via Classthink.com
These three Google Apps have features that set them apart from similar applications that have been installed on your computer's hard drive for many years. First, Google Apps allow users to share, collaborate, give and receive feedback, research within the document, and more. Second, Google Apps offer offline options for users to continue to work on documents started in school even if no Internet access is available. Third, Google Apps are constantly being updated, not just by Google, but also by third-party developers who offer additional Google Add-ons (tools to use within an application) and Google Apps (applications that allow teachers and students to create new projects).

These benefits of Google empower teachers to design lessons which integrate Technology as part of the TPACK model. The functionality of Google Apps allows teachers to climb the SAMR model ladder and teach transformational lessons centered upon Modification and Redefinition.

The following video features some students from Barrington Middle School Station Campus and Barrington Middle School Prairie Campus speaking about how teachers and students use Google Apps.

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